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Andy’s Air Events List

ANDY’S AIR EVENTS LIST

Andy Anderson, Diamond City, AR

Miss Judy’s omelet in a bag is what’s for my breakfast on Saturday. September is really filling up with events. If you do not find something of interest to you over the next 5 weeks you are what I would call “Hard to please”.
Enjoy,
Andy

August 26 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) 8:30 – Noon; Judy’s famous $5.00 “Omelet in a Bag” breakfast fly-in. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 This event will be in the hangar just off the south parking area ** Note CTAF 122.9

August 26 – Bolivar, MO – Bolivar Municipal Airport (M17) 8:00 – 11:00 AM Pancake Breakfast $5.00 donation requested gets you pancakes, sausage, eggs, and drink. This is a recurring 4th Saturday event sponsored by the Saturday Morning Breakfast Flyers. Contact Sam email: ssamysun@gmail.com Phone: ???-???-????

August 26 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) Unicom / CTAF 123.075: EAA chapter 165 Super Breakfast by donation on the 4th Saturday every month. Starts at 8:30 and goes until everybody is stuffed. We strive to make it a Super Breakfast by having all the usual things you expect plus whatever extras we can dig up like blueberry pancakes, French toast, hash browns, fresh fruit, omelets and eggs cooked to order. Our cooks love to surprise you with something they thought up. Come hungry and leave overloaded. There is usually RV formation flying by Bulldog Flight right after breakfast, ride along or fly with them. Contact Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414 or email: marvin@buckeye-access.com

August 26 – Collinsville, OK – Airman Acres (OK93) 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM Wings, Wheels, & Wishes Fly-in; Car and Bike Show benefiting Make-A-Wish Foundation. Kid’s Zone, Raffles, Food Trucks, and Live Music.

August 30 – September 4 – Blakesburg, IA – Antique Airfield (IA27) 47th Annual AAA National Fly-in. Antique Airplane Association Membership is a requirement for admission. If you aren’t already an AAA member never fear you can join on site. Contact me for an AAA event flyer

September 2 – Ponca City, OK – Ponca City Regional Airport (KPNC) First Saturday breakfast. 7:00 – 10:00 AM Fantastic food; very well attended long running event. For a suggested $7.00 donation (and well worth it) you can have pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, biscuits & gravy, orange juice, coffee, and fruit. Sponsored by PNC airport booster club on the first Saturday of every month rain or shine. Contact Bruce Eberle 580-761-5884 ou444@yahoo.com

September 2 – Hot Springs, AR – Memorial Field Airport (KHOT) EAA Chapter 1398 First Saturday Pancake Breakfast & fly-in. 8:30 AM until everyone leaves. Hot Springs Memorial Field Airport Meeting Hall. Suggested donation $7.00. It is all you can eat pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits & gravy, coffee, orange juice and milk and other breakfast items that members bring. For more information contact Bruce Hood at 501.520.9001 or email at flyboyeaa@yahoo.com

September 8 ** 2nd Friday Event – Lonoke, AR – Country Air Estates (1AR9) 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM A recurring Hot Dog, Burgers & Brats cookout at the South West end T hangars the 2nd Friday each month. Come and enjoy good dogs and hangar talk. Fly in or Drive in. Donations go to improve the field. Phone Contact Dave Rottman 231 225 2845 or email apdlox@gmail.com

September 8 – 9 Harrison, AR – Boone County Airport (KHRO) Hot Air Balloon Festival. GA Fly-in Saturday 10:00 – 3:00. Safety Seminars, Food vendors, Kids activities, Tandem sky-dive jumps available for a tax deductable donation of $500. Balloon activities and music concert Friday evening. Classic auto and motorcycle display on Saturday. Information contact Judy Phone 870-741-6954 or 870-577-5196 Must register for tax deductible Tandem Jump. Contact me for info.

September 8 – 9 Norman, OK – University of Oklahoma / Westheimer Airport (KOUN) AOPA Regional Fly-In. Seminars, Vendor Displays, workshops. Information: https://www.aopa.org/community/events/aopa-fly-ins/2017-aopa-fly-ins/norman

September 9 – Walnut Ridge, AR – Walnut Ridge Regional Airport (KARG); 8:00 – 10:00 FREE Fly-In Breakfast sponsored by Wings of Honor Museum. Enjoy French toast, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage gravy, biscuits, hash-browns, coffee, milk, and juice. Special WWII in Review program in the Wings of Honor Museum from 11:00 – 4:00. Presentations on Home Front Facilities followed by WWII POWs in Arkansas then a question and answer session with sack lunch provided. Afternoon session features 93 year old Paul Calkin, a WWII Aerial Gunner’s bird’s eye view perspective of the war from far above the ground. For more information, contact Harold Johnson, 901-828-2257, or harold@bscn.com Unicom 122.8; AWOS, 135.925 (870-886-2537); Airport Phone, 870-886-5432. Contact me for event flyer.

Walnut Ridge Event (AR)

SEPTEMBER 15-17

Beatles at the Ridge Event – 50 years ago. Walnut Ridge AR Free shuttle service provided to the Festival for all who fly in on Saturday the 16th. Fuel discounts on Saturday. Free coffee, water, chips, popcorn and ice cream for pilots and their guest. The Parachute Inn Restaurant will be open, as will the Wings of Honor Museum.

TO READ THE ENTIRE LIST CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE.

 

Fall Events Middle America

August 11 ** 2nd Friday Event – Joplin, Mo – Joplin Regional Airport (KJLN) 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM; Join Alpha Air Center for their second Friday Customer Appreciation Lunch. The menu theme varies with the season. For more information contact Shannon @ 417-623-3113 or email info@alphaaircenter.com

August 11 ** 2nd Friday Event – Lonoke, AR – Country Air Estates (1AR9) 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM A recurring Hot Dog, Burgers & Brats cookout at the South West end T hangars the 2nd Friday each month. Come and enjoy good dogs and hangar talk. Fly in or Drive in. Donations go to improve the field. Phone Contact Dave Rottman 231 225 2845 or email apdlox@gmail.com

August 12 ** Saturday event again this year ** – Oologah, OK – Dog Iron Ranch Airport (OK37) Will Rogers birthplace ranch 7:30 AM – 1:00 PM. Will Rogers – Wiley Post tribute fly-in. 82nd anniversary of Will Roger’s & Wiley Post’s crash at Point-Barrow – Free admission. Five dollar food coupon and goody bag for fly-in pilot; Warbirds, Experimental, Vintage, & Classic aircraft & automobiles. Several food concessions available. A Special moment of remembrance will be observed at 10:00 AM. Bring Lawn Chairs RWY 17 – 35 2000 feet of good turf surface. CTAF: 122.9 Landing lights on in pattern please. More information: Phone: 918-343-8118 or 918-906-7258. http://www.willrogers.com Check Dog Iron Ranch Face book page if weather isn’t cooperating: www.facebook.com/pages/Dog-Iron-Ranch/112239918792683

August 12 – Carlisle, AR – Carlisle Municipal Airport (4M3) EAA Chapter 122 UL will host a Fly-in / Drive-in Breakfast 8:30 – 11:30 AM. This is a recurring event on the second Saturday of each month. Come to socialize. For additional information go to: eaaul122 dot org Contact Steve Ware @ 501-606-6672

August 12 – Miller, MO – Kingsley Field (MO9) Hangar Kafe Fly-in or drive in. Antique Airplanes. Free Breakfast for pilots. Bring Tie Downs. Aircraft judging at 11:00 RV Hook ups Available. Security for Aircraft will be provided. Sky Diving every Saturday Spring through Fall. Contact Phone: 417-452-2277 or 417-452-3831. I have a flyer.

August 12 – Walnut Ridge, AR – Walnut Ridge Regional Airport (KARG); Unicom 122.8; AWOS, 135.925 (870-886-2537); Airport Phone, 870-886-5432. The 75th Anniversary Celebration of the WWII Walnut Ridge Army Air Field continues with a FREE Fly-In Pancake Breakfast, Saturday, August 12, from 8:00 – 10:00, sponsored by Wings of Honor Museum. Enjoy pancakes, bacon, sausage, ham, coffee, milk, juice and fresh fruit. Fuel discounted 10 cents off per gallon on Full Service for August 12th fly-In. (Additional discount for EAA, WINGS, and Military with I.D.) Each Pilot-In-Command will receive a ticket for door prize drawings. Several nice door prizes will be awarded at 10:15 (You do not have to be present to win.) Winners may pick up their prize at the museum anytime through September 9th. WRAAF Anniversary History Books and TEE Shirts available for purchase. For more information, contact Harold Johnson, 901-828-2257, or harold@bscn.com

August 19 – Pine Bluff, AR – Grider Field Airport (KPBF) fly-in breakfast 3rd Saturday of every month. Our specialty is eggs anyway you want them, from fried to eggs Benedict. You should try our omelets. Come enjoy your breakfast in our WWII style Officers Club. A $7.00 donation gets you all you can eat. Contact: Gerald @ 870-377-2728 or email: gwloyd@hotmail.com

August 19 – Berryville, AR – Carroll County Airport (4M1) Third Saturday Event 08:00. FLOUR-DROP & ALL YOU CAN EAT BREAKFAST, $5.00! Scrambled eggs, flapjacks, sausage, bacon, OJ. And as always, $2.99 a gallon AV-GAS all day. 870-423-8393.

August 21 ** A Monday Event ** Solar Eclipse. Events scheduled at several airports in the path of totality. Look for a special events email with airport listings within the next few days. If your airport is having an event this is your last day to get the information to me.

August 26 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) 8:30 – Noon; Judy’s famous $5.00 “Omelet in a Bag” breakfast fly-in. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 This event will be in the hangar just off the south parking area ** Note CTAF 122.9

August 26 – Bolivar, MO – Bolivar Municipal Airport (M17) 8:00 – 11:00 AM Pancake Breakfast $5.00 donation requested gets you pancakes, sausage, eggs, and drink. This is a recurring 4th Saturday event sponsored by the Saturday Morning Breakfast Flyers. Contact Sam email: ssamysun@gmail.com Phone: ???-???-????

August 26 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) Unicom / CTAF 123.075: EAA chapter 165 Super Breakfast by donation on the 4th Saturday every month. Starts at 8:30 and goes until everybody is stuffed. We strive to make it a Super Breakfast by having all the usual things you expect plus whatever extras we can dig up like blueberry pancakes, French toast, hash browns, fresh fruit, omelets and eggs cooked to order. Our cooks love to surprise you with something they thought up. Come hungry and leave overloaded. There is usually RV formation flying by Bulldog Flight right after breakfast, ride along or fly with them. Contact Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414 or email: marvin@buckeye-access.com

August 30 – September 4 – Blakesburg, IA – Antique Airfield (IA27) 47th Annual AAA National Fly-in. Antique Airplane Association Membership is a requirement for admission. If you aren’t already an AAA member never fear you can join on site. Contact me for an AAA event flyer

September 2 – Ponca City, OK – Ponca City Regional Airport (KPNC) First Saturday breakfast. 7:00 – 10:00 AM Fantastic food; very well attended long running event. For a suggested $7.00 donation (and well worth it) you can have pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, biscuits & gravy, orange juice, coffee, and fruit. Sponsored by PNC airport booster club on the first Saturday of every month rain or shine. Contact Bruce Eberle 580-761-5884 ou444@yahoo.com

September 2 – Hot Springs, AR – Memorial Field Airport (KHOT) EAA Chapter 1398 First Saturday Pancake Breakfast & fly-in. 8:30 AM until everyone leaves. Hot Springs Memorial Field Airport Meeting Hall. Suggested donation $7.00. It is all you can eat pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits & gravy, coffee, orange juice and milk and other breakfast items that members bring. For more information contact Bruce Hood at 501.520.9001 or email at flyboyeaa@yahoo.com

September 8 ** 2nd Friday Event – Lonoke, AR – Country Air Estates (1AR9) 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM A recurring Hot Dog, Burgers & Brats cookout at the South West end T hangars the 2nd Friday each month. Come and enjoy good dogs and hangar talk. Fly in or Drive in. Donations go to improve the field. Phone Contact Dave Rottman 231 225 2845 or email apdlox@gmail.com

September 8 – 9 Harrison, AR – Boone County Airport (KHRO) Hot Air Balloon Festival. GA Fly-in Saturday 10:00 – 3:00. Safety Seminars, Food vendors, Kids activities, Tandem sky-dive jumps available for a tax deductable donation of $500. Balloon activities and music concert Friday evening. Classic auto and motorcycle display on Saturday. Information contact Judy Phone 870-741-6954 or 870-577-5196 Must register for tax deductible Tandem Jump. Contact me for info.

September 8 – 9 Norman, OK – University of Oklahoma / Westheimer Airport (KOUN) AOPA Regional Fly-In. Seminars, Vendor Displays, workshops. Information: https://www.aopa.org/community/events/aopa-fly-ins/2017-aopa-fly-ins/norman

September 9 – Lost Bridge Village , AR (40AR) 11th Annual Fly-in and Car Show, 11AM to 2PM. ** Fly-in to the surfaced, 3150 Ft. airstrip, on the North Shore of Beaver Lake, located 9 NM East of Rogers , Arkansas , (KROG). Recommended landing on 31, takeoff on 13 (Note: Rapidly rising terrain to the North; Trees at both ends and close proximity to the side of the runway.) CTAF 122.8; Elev. 1440 ft. Display of Aircraft/Classic Cars, Motorcycles/Scooters/Boats, etc. Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Chips, Water and Soft Drinks will be furnished. Enjoy Live Music and Shaded Picnic Tables. For more information or to receive a flier on the event, Contact: Jon Testut 479-359-3204, or Ken Buchheit 479-200-5475 email: kmbnow@sbcglobal.net
September 9 – Carlisle, AR – Carlisle Municipal Airport (4M3) EAA Chapter 122 UL will host a Fly-in / Drive-in Breakfast 8:30 – 11:30 AM. This is a recurring event on the second Saturday of each month. Come to socialize. For additional information go to: eaaul122 dot org Contact Steve Ware @ 501-606-6672

September 9 & 10 – Joplin, Mo – Joplin Regional Airport (KJLN) Airshow For more information contact Shannon @ 417-623-3113 or email info@alphaaircenter.com

September 16 – Oswego, KS – Oswego Municipal Airport (K67) Breakfast 8:00 – 10:30; Lunch 11:00 – 1:00 Meals provided by Oswego Lions Club – Donations accepted. For more information Phone 620-795-4433 Contact me for event flyer.

September 16 – Pine Bluff, AR – Grider Field Airport (KPBF) fly-in breakfast 3rd Saturday of every month. Our specialty is eggs anyway you want them, from fried to eggs Benedict. You should try our omelets. Come enjoy your breakfast in our WWII style Officers Club. A $7.00 donation gets you all you can eat. Contact: Gerald @ 870-377-2728 or email: gwloyd@hotmail.com

September 16 – Berryville, AR – Carroll County Airport (4M1) Third Saturday Event TBD

September 16 – Rogers, AR – Rogers Municipal Airport (KROG) 7th Annual Take Off for Kids charity event!. This is our annual fund raiser for the Wright Flight Program of the Tailwind Aviation Foundation. The event combines a 5-airport poker run (KROG-KGMJ-KHFJ-KHRO-KVBT), spot landing contest, flight timing contest and a flour drop. Fabulous prizes for first through third place in each contest. Start with an 8:00 AM breakfast at Rogers, AR (KROG), finish with lunch and awards at Bentonville Municipal Airport (KVBT). Fee: $75 per person. Bring a co-pilot and passengers! Check out the details, pics of previous events and register at www.take-off-for-kids.com. Advance registration is requested to help us with food planning. You don’t want to miss this one. Contact info: (479) 254-0817.

September 23 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) 11:00 – 2:00; Judy’s famous $7.00 “MO00 Burger or MO00 Dog” lunch fly-in. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 This event will be in the hangar just off the south parking area ** Note CTAF 122.9

September 23 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) Unicom / CTAF 123.075: EAA chapter 165 Super Breakfast by donation on the 4th Saturday every month. Starts at 8:30 and goes until everybody is stuffed. We strive to make it a Super Breakfast by having all the usual things you expect plus whatever extras we can dig up like blueberry pancakes, French toast, hash browns, fresh fruit, omelets and eggs cooked to order. Our cooks love to surprise you with something they thought up. Come hungry and leave overloaded. There is usually RV formation flying by Bulldog Flight right after breakfast, ride along or fly with them. Contact Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414 or email: marvin@buckeye-access.com

September 30 – Ketchum, OK – South Grand Lake Regional Airport (1K8) Hook N’ Cook Off ~ Airport Event Grounds. 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM. South Grand Lake Chamber’s 24th annual event will include cooking teams competing for Best Fish, Hush Puppies, and Coleslaw. Tasting kits will be provided and public voting will determine the winners for each category.
There will be live music, vendors and activities for kids. Chamber www.grandlakechamber.org. Info. 918-782-3214. Airport information info@southgrandlakeairport.com

*** Sometimes plans change and it is advisable to check before you go. ***

If you would like to be removed from, or added to, this email distribution list just send me an email.

Blue Skies,

Andy — email: andya@diamondcity.net

 

RAF Arkansas

raf-1RAF Opens New Airstrip in Arkansas
The Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF) announces the opening of Trigger Gap, a new recreational airstrip, this time in the beautiful Ozark Mountains of northwest Arkansas. It lies on lands owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) above the Kings River. The RAF developed this new turf airstrip through grants, donations and volunteer efforts. Its future is ensured by a long-term lease with TNC and local RAF volunteers have committed to its ongoing maintenance.
“Our success is the result of having developed a great partnership with this international conservation organization,” said RAF Arkansas Liaison Dave Powell. “This new destination will help us broaden the community of recreational flyers. It has good approaches and is three thousand feet long,” he added.
“Trigger Gap is ready for the public to enjoy now,” said RAF Director Tim Clifford. Runways are 10/28 and lined with cones on 200-ft spacing. Windsocks are located on the SW and NE corners. There are two fire rings and wood on site. A vault toilet is planned for next spring, and currently you need to provide your own water. Campers will enjoy a great view over the Kings River, famous for small mouth bass fishing. As a special treat, nearby Kings River Outfitters offers pickup and return service to the airstrip.
Clifford visualized the opportunities surrounding this location on Pension Mountain, and said the RAF is looking at similar projects throughout the Ozarks. “This recreational destination is close to the large metropolitan area around Bentonville,” Powell said, “and it offers a beautiful recreational flying destination for both experienced pilots and those new to this kind of flying.”
Why “Trigger Gap”? The nearby bend in the river resembles a trigger, according to locals.
Why “Pension Mountain”? According to local historian M.D. Anglin, the name comes from the fact Civil War veterans settled there. “Yankees drew a Federal pension, a pretty good wad for those times,” Anglin wrote. Some of their descendants still live there.
Trigger Gap is just 3.2 nm south of Carroll County Airport (4M1) where there are courtesy cars and services. Within an hour’s drive is Ridgefield, MO, and Big Cedar Lodge Resort, built by John Morris, founder and CEO of the famous Bass Pro Shops. It features World-class Top of the Rock Golf Course, wine and dining options, horseback riding, and folks can even rent a golf cart to enjoy miles of paths through Dogwood Canyon Nature Park and Lost Canyon Caves. “The Native American Heritage Museum is there, which rivals the famous Buffalo Bill Center in Cody, Wyoming,” Clifford said.

The Recreational Aviation Foundation is a public 501(c)3 nonprofit organization formed in 2003 to preserve, maintain and create airstrips for recreational access. Its headquarters are 1711 W. College St., Bozeman, MT 59715, www.TheRAF.org

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Arkansas Aviation Hall of Fame 2015

AAHS Event Flyer S

We are proud to announce the 2015 Aviation Hall of Fame event for Arkansas.  Prices, times, place are included in the download.  If you need more information, contact Ralph McCormick at 479-970-1001.

Jim Gaston Goes West

Jim Gaston

Jim Gaston

Arkansas, aviation, and I lost a dear friend, today. I first met Jim in the 1980s. He was an extremely nice person who had a great deal of interest in everyone around him. As owner of Gaston’s Resort, his life came into contact with so many people. As president of the Arkansas Aviation Historical Society, I had the pleasure of notifying his family before he passed that was a nominee to receive the 2015 Arkansas Aviation Hall of Fame award.

There was so much more to Jim than just aviation. He was so strong in the Arkansas Parks and Tourism for many years. He was a good friend to everyone and had many abilities; flying, community and state service, photographer, collector of antiques, lover of wild life, but most of all a good friend to everyone he came in contact.

Jim has touched many people over his seventy-three years and many don’t even realize it. His role as member of the Arkansas Parks and Tourism committee for many years effected Arkansans and tourists from so many states.

Received the Arkansas Tourism Person of the Year Award in 1985 and the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame in 1992. In 1998 was chosen by Active Years as one of the Most Admired People in Arkansas. In 2010, Jim was chosen as the Arkansas Business Executive of the Year. Held various leadership positions with the Arkansas Hospitality Ajim gaston240ssociation and received the Associations Silver Cup for Tourism Award.   Has served on the board of the Mountain Home Chamber of Commerce and the Ozark Mountain Region. Served as a volunteer at the Bull Shoals State Park Visitor Center that bears his name the Jim A. Gaston Visitor Center.

Richard Davies, Arkansas Parks and Tourism Department, said, “Jim Gaston was a good friend with Gov. Dale Bumpers. Much of the time Gaston was ahead of his time.

i.e. In 1998 Gaston urged the State Parks and Tourism to get on the, at that time, unknown Internet. He performed great on committees always being two steps ahead of the other board members. His interest turned from Aviation to motorcycles, steam engines, fountain pens, watches, guns and on.”

As Jim’s friend, I will miss him very much. God be with his family and friends during this difficult time.

Ralph McCormick, Publisher FLY-LOW Publications

President of AAHS

ARKANSAS FREEDOM FUND PLANE

FF 1-4To find our more about having this antique plane at your air event, contact classic_tours@sbcglobal.net. 

Now booking for 2015 and 2016. 

TRANSITION TO A TWIN

By Mark Frankum

Are light multi engine aircraft gaining renewed appeal?  As fuel prices climbed during the post-2009 economic recovery, many aircraft owners and operators traded their light multi engine aircraft for more fuel efficient, high-performance singles. Many of these sophisticated singles deliver the speed the owners are looking for while sacrificing a certain amount of useful load, roominess, and perceived safety advantages. One obvious result of this paradigm shift is a very depressed market for light twins. Many light twins that might have fetched more than $250k before the market crash now sell for perhaps 60% of that former value.
Now, with Avgas prices tumbling nationwide, many are giving light twins a second look partly because the gap between the operating costs associated with a light twin versus the costs of operating a high-performance single is narrowing.  Sure, it’s still more expensive to operate a light twin, but with cheaper fuel many are reconsidering the advantages a light twin offers such as increased payload, range, climb performance, cabin space and the added margin of safety they might afford. The cost of admission is still cheap and the cost to play thegame just went down. Indeed, some flight schools are noting an uptick in multi engine training.
What about the safety advantage? Are light twins safer than light singles? Seems the answer is not so cut-and-dry. Some might say, “I like the added safety of two engines” while others insist “the only thing the second engine does is take you to the scene of the crash.”  Let’s consider the ubiquitous Beechcraft Bonanza versus the Beechcraft Baron. These airplanes share many of the same systems and the fuselages are nearly identical. The Model 58 Baron shares the A36 Bonanza’s fuselage. The Baron comes with an extra engine, two vacuum pumps, two alternators, and often flies off with a nicer avionics suite than the typical Bonanza.  Intuitively, we associate “extra” with “safer”. For many years insurance companies must have thought so too, and charged lower premiums for the twin. This seems to have changed, perhaps after they examined the loss rates a bit more closely. The result is now a general reluctance among insurance underwriters to insure light twins without increasing the training and pilot experience requirements In certain situations the extra engine may come with extra liabilities. These liabilities are most evident when we examine “loss of directional control following an engine failure” accidents, particularly on takeoff when light twins are most vulnerable. If, after an engine failure, the airspeed is allowed to fall below the single engine minimum controllable airspeed (Vmc), only prompt action can prevent the dreaded Vmc roll. Without question, the Bonanza fairs better than the Baron when it comes to fatal takeoff accidents simply because loss of directional control following and engine loss is far less common with the Bonanza. The inherent controllability issues when a twin experiences an engine failure on takeoff, and how well or badly the pilot handles the emergency, often determine the outcome. Sadly, statistics suggest over 80% of these “loss of control following and engine loss” accidents, in Barons specifically, involved some degree of pilot error or aircraft mismanagement rather than purely mechanical failures. The data seem to suggest errors such as selecting the wrong fuel tank or fuel pump mismanagement accounted for many of the engine failures in the first place. But all too often it was what happened after the engine failure that separated the quick from the dead. Turns out many of the aircraft that met a tragic end may have continued to fly had the pilot performed everything right, and performed it right then. The airplane should have been capable of continued flight – but the pilot was not.
One of the most important steps following an engine failure during a critical phase of flight (such as on takeoff) is getting the propeller of the inoperative engine feathered to reduce drag. Feathering stops the prop and twists the blades so the leading edges of the blades are faced into the relative wind as it comes to a stop. This greatly reduces the very substantial drag created by windmilling prop blades. With many light twin aircraft, a windmilling propeller will reduce the rate of climb by some 200-350 feet per minute, which may be beyond the aircraft’s performance capability on just one engine. When a twin engine aircraft loses an engine, it will lose about 80% of its rate of climb. This is because rate of climb is a function of excess horsepower, specifically horsepower in excess of the power needed to sustain level flight. An airplane with two, 200 horsepower engines has a total of 400 available horsepower. Perhaps 160 horsepower (about 40%) is required for level flight leaving 240 hp (60%) available for climb. If we lose an engine we are down to 200 hp leaving only 40 hp (20% of two-engine total power) available for climb. Thus we lose about 80% of our climb rate. Keep in mind it will be much more than an 80% loss of performance if the pilot fails to feather the prop on the inoperative engine. This 80% reduction in climb performance is best case and assumes we did everything right – and we did it right then.
A good friend of mine and fellow DPE with the Little Rock FSDO region, Rick De Angelo, may have summed it up with a simple corollary: “A multi engine aircraft on takeoff is like a team of horses pulling a wagon up a hill. If one of the horses suddenly drops dead, the remaining horse will have a tough time pulling the wagon up the hill while dragging a dead horse along. But if the teamster climbs down and cuts the harness away from the dead horse, the remaining horse stands a much better chance of pulling the wagon to the top of the hill.” What a simple and elegant analogy! A windmilling prop is like dragging a dead horse. We can cut away that dead horse by feathering.
The most important decisions a multi engine pilot must make must be made before the brakes are released for takeoff. This is usually incorporated into an abort plan briefing conducted just prior to takeoff. The pilot must have a clear, orderly flow of actions to accomplish in the event an engine fails at any point during the takeoff, whether still on the runway, at rotation, or during the initial climb. It is well to note that single engine climb performance must be calculated for each and every takeoff. As Kenny Rogers put it “you have to know when to hold them and know when to fold them”. To attempt continued flight when the performance charts clearly say it’s not possible is just foolish. Unfortunately, after liftoff we have precious little time to pull the performance charts out. Indecision can be deadly – we don’t have time to wait and see if it’s going to climb while we are trying to hold blue line airspeed. And we certainly won’t have time to get the checklist out. We must be well versed and current on the basic engine failure procedures. I doubt there a multi engine pilot alive who does not know the multi mantra: “5 ups” (mixture, props, throttle, flaps, and gear all up), identify, verify, feather, and secure. These are nine little words committed to memory that must be translated into actions we can do in our sleep in the event of an engine failure during a critical phase of flight such as take off. Assume it will happen on your next takeoff.  What are the chances this could happen on your very first solo flight in a twin? Read on.
I received an email yesterday from a gentleman that passed his multi engine check ride with me less than two weeks ago. He had just completed an accelerated multi engine course prior to the check ride and had recently completed type-specific training in his new Cessna 421. On his first solo flight in his Cessna 421 he experienced an engine failure due to a fuel system mechanical failure. Thanks to the skills he mastered during his training, the story has a happy ending. He managed the emergency well and landed uneventfully. I didn’t ask, but I suspect he might agree the outcome may not have been as pleasant had he been in his turbine single that night. I’m pretty sure the rate of climb his 421 can muster on a single engine is a lot better than the rate of climb his Jet Prop could maintain after an engine failure. Don’t even need to do the math to calculate those percentages. Multi engine airplanes, in certain situations, can be safer than singles.  Training, both initial and recurrent training can make the difference.
Transition (back) to Multi Engine Aircraft
Are light multi engine aircraft gaining renewed appeal?  As fuel prices climbed during the post-2009 economic recovery, many aircraft owners and operators traded their light multi engine aircraft for more fuel efficient, high-performance singles. Many of these sophisticated singles deliver the speed the owners are looking for while sacrificing a certain amount of useful load, roominess, and perceived safety advantages. One obvious result of this paradigm shift is a very depressed market for light twins. Many light twins that might have fetched more than $250k before the market crash now sell for perhaps 60% of that former value.
Now, with Avgas prices tumbling nationwide, many are giving light twins a second look partly because the gap between the operating costs associated with a light twin versus the costs of operating a high-performance single is narrowing.  Sure, it’s still more expensive to operate a light twin, but with cheaper fuel many are reconsidering the advantages a light twin offers such as increased payload, range, climb performance, cabin space and the added margin of safety they might afford. The cost of admission is still cheap and the cost to play the game just went down. Indeed, some flight schools are noting an uptick in multi engine training.
What about the safety advantage? Are light twins safer than light singles? Seems the answer is not so cut-and-dry. Some might say, “I like the added safety of two engines” while others insist “the only thing the second engine does is take you to the scene of the crash.”  Let’s consider the ubiquitous Beechcraft Bonanza versus the Beechcraft Baron. These airplanes share many of the same systems and the fuselages are nearly identical. The Model 58 Baron shares the A36 Bonanza’s fuselage. The Baron comes with an extra engine, two vacuum pumps, two alternators, and often flies off with a nicer avionics suite than the typical Bonanza.  Intuitively, we associate “extra” with “safer”. For many years insurance companies must have thought so too, and charged lower premiums for the twin. This seems to have changed, perhaps after they examined the loss rates a bit more closely. The result is now a general reluctance among insurance underwriters to insure light twins without increasing the training and pilot experience requirements.
In certain situations the extra engine may come with extra liabilities. These liabilities are most evident when we examine “loss of directional control following an engine failure” accidents, particularly on takeoff when light twins are most vulnerable. If, after an engine failure, the airspeed is allowed to fall below the single engine minimum controllable airspeed (Vmc), only prompt action can prevent the dreaded Vmc roll. Without question, the Bonanza fairs better than the Baron when it comes to fatal takeoff accidents simply because loss of directional control following and engine loss is far less common with the Bonanza. The inherent controllability issues when a twin experiences an engine failure on takeoff, and how well or badly the pilot handles the emergency, often determine the outcome. Sadly, statistics suggest over 80% of these “loss of control following and engine loss” accidents, in Barons specifically, involved some degree of pilot error or aircraft mismanagement rather than purely mechanical failures. The data seem to suggest errors such as selecting the wrong fuel tank or fuel pump mismanagement accounted for many of the engine failures in the first place. But all too often it was what happened after the engine failure that separated the quick from the dead. Turns out many of the aircraft that met a tragic end may have continued to fly had the pilot performed everything right, and performed it right then. The airplane should have been capable of continued flight – but the pilot was not.
One of the most important steps following an engine failure during a critical phase of flight (such as on takeoff) is getting the propeller of the inoperative engine feathered to reduce drag. Feathering stops the prop and twists the blades so the leading edges of the blades are faced into the relative wind as it comes to a stop. This greatly reduces the very substantial drag created by windmilling prop blades. With many light twin aircraft, a windmilling propeller will reduce the rate of climb by some 200-350 feet per minute, which may be beyond the aircraft’s performance capability on just one engine. When a twin engine aircraft loses an engine, it will lose about 80% of its rate of climb. This is because rate of climb is a function of excess horsepower, specifically horsepower in excess of the power needed to sustain level flight. An airplane with two, 200 horsepower engines has a total of 400 available horsepower. Perhaps 160 horsepower (about 40%) is required for level flight leaving 240 hp (60%) available for climb. If we lose an engine we are down to 200 hp leaving only 40 hp (20% of two-engine total power) available for climb. Thus we lose about 80% of our climb rate. Keep in mind it will be much more than an 80% loss of performance if the pilot fails to feather the prop on the inoperative engine. This 80% reduction in climb performance is best case and assumes we did everything right – and we did it right then.
A good friend of mine and fellow DPE with the Little Rock FSDO region, Rick De Angelo, may have summed it up with a simple corollary: “A multi engine aircraft on takeoff is like a team of horses pulling a wagon up a hill. If one of the horses suddenly drops dead, the remaining horse will have a tough time pulling the wagon up the hill while dragging a dead horse along. But if the teamster climbs down and cuts the harness away from the dead horse, the remaining horse stands a much better chance of pulling the wagon to the top of the hill.” What a simple and elegant analogy! A windmilling prop is like dragging a dead horse. We can cut away that dead horse by feathering.
The most important decisions a multi engine pilot must make must be made before the brakes are released for takeoff. This is usually incorporated into an abort plan briefing conducted just prior to takeoff. The pilot must have a clear, orderly flow of actions to accomplish in the event an engine fails at any point during the takeoff, whether still on the runway, at rotation, or during the initial climb. It is well to note that single engine climb performance must be calculated for each and every takeoff. As Kenny Rogers put it “you have to know when to hold them and know when to fold them”. To attempt continued flight when the performance charts clearly say it’s not possible is just foolish. Unfortunately, after liftoff we have precious little time to pull the performance charts out. Indecision can be deadly – we don’t have time to wait and see if it’s going to climb while we are trying to hold blue line airspeed. And we certainly won’t have time to get the checklist out. We must be well versed and current on the basic engine failure procedures. I doubt there a multi engine pilot alive who does not know the multi mantra: “5 ups” (mixture, props, throttle, flaps, and gear all up), identify, verify, feather, and secure. These are nine little words committed to memory that must be translated into actions we can do in our sleep in the event of an engine failure during a critical phase of flight such as take off. Assume it will happen on your next takeoff.  What are the chances this could happen on your very first solo flight in a twin? Read on.
I received an email yesterday from a gentleman that passed his multi engine check ride with me less than two weeks ago. He had just completed an accelerated multi engine course prior to the check ride and had recently completed type-specific training in his new Cessna 421. On his first solo flight in his Cessna 421 he experienced an engine failure due to a fuel system mechanical failure. Thanks to the skills he mastered during his training, the story has a happy ending. He managed the emergency well and landed uneventfully. I didn’t ask, but I suspect he might agree the outcome may not have been as pleasant had he been in his turbine single that night. I’m pretty sure the rate of climb his 421 can muster on a single engine is a lot better than the rate of climb his Jet Prop could maintain after an engine failure. Don’t even need to do the math to calculate those percentages. Multi engine airplanes, in certain situations, can be safer than singles.  Training, both initial and recurrent training can make the difference.

Andy’s List of Fly-Ins

J&ABranson2009The big area event this weekend is the Walnut Ridge 17th annual airfield Reunion and fly-in with events both Friday and Saturday. Currently the weather looks great for both days. Saturday offers free breakfast (this is a full breakfast with multiple choices), Safety Seminar, and Free BBQ lunch. Then Free cookout in the afternoon for all veterans. Contact me for event flyer.

For those who could not attend the Golden Aerodrome event last weekend, there was good food, presentations, fellowship, tall tales and great music. The Smith’s are already planning for next year and want everyone to “Save the Date” of the last weekend in April 2016 for the 5th annual Flying Circus. “A good time will be had by all”.

Fly Safe,
Andy
May 1-2 – Walnut Ridge, AR – Walnut Ridge Airport (KARG) Walnut Ridge Airport / Wings of Honor Museum 17th Annual Air Field Reunion & the airport’s 73rd Birthday party. Walnut Ridge was an Aviation Cadet WWII Training facility and there is a museum on the field. ARG is also the home of The Parachute Inn, a restaurant inside a retired SW Airlines 737. The weekend has a wide variety of programs, meals, and remembrances. Free Breakfast for pilot and pax from 7:00 – 9:30; Safety Seminar 10:30 – 11:45 with drawing for Go Pro Camera followed by Free BBQ lunch for seminar attendees. Click on Subject: What is That Yellow Airplane Doing ?
For information and registration.  Salute to Veterans includes a cookout from 2:30 – 5:00 with music & food Free to all Veterans. Generous fuel discount throughout the day.  Many more activities. Contact me for an event flyer.

May 2 – Ponca City, OK – Ponca City Regional Airport (KPNC) First Saturday breakfast. 7:00 – 10:00 AM Fantastic food; very well attended long running event. For a suggested $6.00 donation (and well worth it) you can have pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, biscuits & gravy, orange juice, coffee, and fruit. Sponsored by PNC airport booster club on the first Saturday of every month rain or shine.

May 7-10, 2015 – Ozark, AR –Byrd’s Backcountry Airstrip (Lat: 35 40′ 37″N Long: 93 43’ 59”W) Tenth annual Spring Fly-in. 2 grass runways along the Mulberry River in Arkansas. Beautiful scenery in remote setting. New riverside restaurant, cabins, RV hookups, under-wing camping, and large restroom with hot showers. On the web @ http://www.byrdsadventurecenter.com/activities/fly.html Phone contact: 479-667-4066

May 8 ** 2nd Friday Event – Joplin, Mo – Joplin Regional Airport (KJLN) 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM; Join Alpha Air Center for their second Friday Lunch. The menu theme varies with the season. The May theme is Cinco De Mayo and the menu is tacos & machos. Contact me for an event flyer. For more information contact Megan Atkins 417-623-3113 or email matkins@alphaaircenter.com
May 9 – Carlisle, AR – Carlisle Municipal Airport (4M3) EAA Chapter 122 UL will host a Fly-in / Drive-in Breakfast 8:30 – 11:30 AM. This is a recurring event on the second Saturday of each month. Come to socialize and have a very good meal for a modest donation.  For additional information go to: eaaul122.org

May 9 – Pocahontas, AR – Pocahontas Municipal Airport (M70) EAA Chapter 437 5th annual Fly-in & Young Eagles Program. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM Pilots eat lunch FREE Static Displays, rides, 50/50 raffle . For More info: contact Henry Gross at hgross2@suddenlink.net

May 9 – Horseshoe Bend, AR – Horseshoe Bend Airport (6M2) Annual Dogwood Days Celebration All day with Pancake Breakfast at Methodist Church 7 – 11AM Free shuttle transportation provided from airport to breakfast and all events. For more information contact: Jim Sawica E-mail: jjs51@sbcglobal.net Phone 314-799-2387

May 14-17 – Branson, MO – Clark/Downtown Airport (KPLK) USPA Flyin/Annual Meeting kicks off Thursday evening @ 7:00 pm with Safety Seminar in the KPLK terminal building. Hospitality room, informative GA meetings, fun Branson activities. ALL PILOTS WELCOME!  More info at www.uspilots.org.  Or contact Jan Hoynacki, jan@uspilots.org, 417-338-2225.

May 16 – Pine Bluff, AR – Grider Field Airport (KPBF) fly-in breakfast 3rd Saturday of every month.  Our specialty is eggs anyway you want them, from fried to eggs Benedict. You should try our omelets.  Come enjoy your breakfast in our WWII style Officers Club.  A $7.00 donation gets you all you can eat.  Contact: GERALD email: gwloyd@hotmail.com

May 16 – Stroud, OK – Stroud Municipal Airport (KSUD) Our First Ever fly-in FREE pancake Breakfast 7:00 – 11:00 AM All you can eat. Come see the new hangars and fuel farm. For information contact fwood@cityofstroud.com Phone 918-968-4043. Contact me for event flyer.
May 16 – Ketchum, OK South Grand Lake Regional Airport (1K8) The Girlfriends of the Airport invite the public and pilots to a day of air fun. Commemorative Air Force PT-19 rides. Advanced reservations 918-859-3100. Tethered balloon rides $10.00. Wheel Chair accessible and Kid Friendly. Aircraft such as Super Cub, RV, CT, Chip Monk, Stearman, Seaplane, Helicopter, War Birds, etc will be available for viewing. Remote Control Aircraft will be on display and in action. The GRDA helicopter and staff will be on hand to answer questions. Civil Air Patrol Aircraft and cadets will be on site participating.  $5 – donation hamburgers, beans and chips, and $3 hotdogs will be served from 11:00 am to 1:30 pm. Water and beverages 10:00 am to 3:30 pm.  Air Day pilots flying in will receive two food tickets per engine.  Fuel price: 100 LL $ 3.65 and Jet A $ 3.40. Pilots interested in participating contact Dan Diehl: 918-230-4508, dan@diehlaero.com  Event information: info@southgrandlakeairport.com or Brent Howard 918-693-1855.  Updates: www.southgrandlakeairport.com
May 23 – North Little

Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) EAA chapter 165 Luncheon on the 4th Saturday every month, served, 11 to 1PM in the EAA hangar which is heated for the winter months and has big fans for the summer time.  A donation of $7.00 is suggested for all you can eat and the menu is different each month.  Usually there is formation practice for RV’s in the morning and sometimes again in the afternoon so come early and work up an appetite.  Contact: Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414

May 23 – Claremore, OK – Claremore Regional Airport (KGCM) Fly-in lunch 11am-1pm Normally menu is hamburgers and hotdogs and occasionally hot links or brats. Donations requested to keep the monthly fly-in supported.  Everybody is welcome, fly in or drive. Call the airport for more info 918-343-0931.

May 23 – Owasso, OK – Gundy’s Airport (O38) Pancake Breakfast sponsored by EAA chapter 10 donations requested for breakfast. For additional information contact: Joel Howard at oklahomajoel@yahoo.com or call 918-645-2635

May 30 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) Fly-in lunch 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM MO00 Dog or MO00 Burger $7.00 per person. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 http://www.turkeymountainairport.com

May 30 – Owasso, OK – Gundy’s Airport (O38) EAA Chapter 10 poker run to 5 different airports. $20 per hand includes lunch. For information contact: Joel Howard at oklahomajoel@yahoo.com or call 918-645-2635

June 6 – Ponca City, OK – Ponca City Regional Airport (KPNC) First Saturday breakfast. 7:00 – 10:00 AM Fantastic food; very well attended long running event. For a suggested $6.00 donation (and well worth it) you can have pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, biscuits & gravy, orange juice, coffee, and fruit. Sponsored by PNC airport booster club on the first Saturday of every month rain or shine.

June 13 – Carlisle, AR – Carlisle Municipal Airport (4M3) EAA Chapter 122 UL will host a Fly-in / Drive-in Breakfast 8:30 – 11:30 AM. This is a recurring event on the second Saturday of each month. Come to socialize and have a very good meal for a modest donation.  For additional information go to: eaaul122.org

June 27 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) In-The-Bag Omelet fly-in 9:00 AM – Noon $5.00 per person. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 http://www.turkeymountainairport.com
June 27 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) EAA chapter 165 Luncheon on the 4th Saturday every month, served, 11 to 1PM in the EAA hangar which is heated for the winter months and has big fans for the summer time.  A donation of $7.00 is suggested for all you can eat and the menu is different each month.  Usually there is formation practice for RV’s in the morning and sometimes again in the afternoon so come early and work up an appetite.  Contact: Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414

*** Sometimes plans change and it is advisable to check before you go. ***

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Blue Skies,

Andy — email: andya@diamondcity.net