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Andy’s List

J&ABranson2009Last weekend was wonderful for flying. The Walnut Ridge event drew 64 aircraft on Saturday and the monthly Ponca City breakfast had 53 aircraft and served 487 meals. (They have lots of local drive-ins each month.) I would say that both events were a big success. I hope we have many more fantastic flying weekends this season.

Jim Davis, a cancer survivor and experimental aircraft builder from Mountain Home Arkansas, departed last week on his cancer awareness mission of giving airplane rides to cancer victims in each of the lower 48 states. You can follow the “Passion Flights For Life” trips of Jim Davis on his Online Blog: flyinggeminpurplepassion.blogspot.com  or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/passionflightsforlife?fref=ts&ref=br_tf Be safe and Godspeed, Jim.

Fly Safe,
Andy Anderson
May 7-10, 2015 – Ozark, AR –Byrd’s Backcountry Airstrip (Lat: 35 40′ 37″N Long: 93 43’ 59”W) Tenth annual Spring Fly-in. 2 grass runways along the Mulberry River in Arkansas. Beautiful scenery in remote setting. New riverside restaurant, cabins, RV hookups, under-wing camping, and large restroom with hot showers. On the web @ http://www.byrdsadventurecenter.com/activities/fly.html Phone contact: 479-667-4066

May 8 ** 2nd Friday Event – Joplin, Mo – Joplin Regional Airport (KJLN) 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM; Join Alpha Air Center for their second Friday Lunch. The menu theme varies with the season. The May theme is Cinco De Mayo and the menu is tacos & machos. Contact me for an event flyer. For more information contact Megan Atkins 417-623-3113 or email matkins@alphaaircenter.com
May 9 – Carlisle, AR – Carlisle Municipal Airport (4M3) EAA Chapter 122 UL will host a Fly-in / Drive-in Breakfast 8:30 – 11:30 AM. This is a recurring event on the second Saturday of each month. Come to socialize and have a very good meal for a modest donation.  For additional information go to: eaaul122.org

May 9 – Pocahontas, AR – Pocahontas Municipal Airport (M70) EAA Chapter 437 5th annual Fly-in & Young Eagles Program. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM Pilots eat lunch FREE Static Displays, rides, 50/50 raffle . For More info: contact Henry Gross at hgross2@suddenlink.net

May 9 – Horseshoe Bend, AR – Horseshoe Bend Airport (6M2) Annual Dogwood Days Celebration All day with Pancake Breakfast at Methodist Church 7 – 11AM Free shuttle transportation provided from airport to breakfast and all events. For more information contact: Jim Sawica E-mail: jjs51@sbcglobal.net Phone 314-799-2387

May 14-17 – Branson, MO – Clark/Downtown Airport (KPLK) USPA Flyin/Annual Meeting kicks off Thursday evening @ 7:00 pm with Safety Seminar in the KPLK terminal building. Hospitality room, informative GA meetings, fun Branson activities. ALL PILOTS WELCOME!  More info at www.uspilots.org.  Or contact Jan Hoynacki, jan@uspilots.org, 417-338-2225.

May 16 – Pine Bluff, AR – Grider Field Airport (KPBF) fly-in breakfast 3rd Saturday of every month.  Our specialty is eggs anyway you want them, from fried to eggs Benedict. You should try our omelets.  Come enjoy your breakfast in our WWII style Officers Club.  A $7.00 donation gets you all you can eat.  Contact: GERALD email: gwloyd@hotmail.com

May 16 – Stroud, OK – Stroud Municipal Airport (KSUD) Our First Ever fly-in FREE pancake Breakfast 7:00 – 11:00 AM All you can eat. Come see the new hangars and fuel farm. For information contact fwood@cityofstroud.com Phone 918-968-4043. Contact me for event flyer.

May 16 – Ketchum, OK South Grand Lake Regional Airport (1K8) The Girlfriends of the Airport invite the public and pilots to a day of air fun. Commemorative Air Force PT-19 rides. Advanced reservations 918-859-3100. Tethered balloon rides $10.00. Wheel Chair accessible and Kid Friendly. Aircraft such as Super Cub, RV, CT, Chip Monk, Stearman, Seaplane, Helicopter, War Birds, etc will be available for viewing. Remote Control Aircraft will be on display and in action. The GRDA helicopter and staff will be on hand to answer questions. Civil Air Patrol Aircraft and cadets will be on site participating.  $5 – donation hamburgers, beans and chips, and $3 hotdogs will be served from 11:00 am to 1:30 pm. Water and beverages 10:00 am to 3:30 pm.  Air Day pilots flying in will receive two food tickets per engine.  Fuel price: 100 LL $ 3.65 and Jet A $ 3.40. Pilots interested in participating contact Dan Diehl: 918-230-4508, dan@diehlaero.com  Event information: info@southgrandlakeairport.com or Brent Howard 918-693-1855.  Updates: www.southgrandlakeairport.com Contact for Flyer.

May 23 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) EAA chapter 165 Luncheon on the 4th Saturday every month, served, 11 to 1PM in the EAA hangar which is heated for the winter months and has big fans for the summer time.  A donation of $7.00 is suggested for all you can eat and the menu is different each month.  Usually there is formation practice for RV’s in the morning and sometimes again in the afternoon so come early and work up an appetite.  Contact: Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414

May 23 – Claremore, OK – Claremore Regional Airport (KGCM) Fly-in lunch 11am-1pm Normally menu is hamburgers and hotdogs and occasionally hot links or brats. Donations requested to keep the monthly fly-in supported.  Everybody is welcome, fly in or drive. Call the airport for more info 918-343-0931.

May 23 – Owasso, OK – Gundy’s Airport (O38) Pancake Breakfast sponsored by EAA chapter 10 donations requested for breakfast. For additional information contact: Joel Howard at oklahomajoel@yahoo.com or call 918-645-2635

May 28-31 – Sulphur Springs, TX – Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport (KSLR) LadiesLove TailDraggers Texas Fly-in/Splash-in 2015 For information and registration: click: Fly-in Information & Registration

May 30 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) Fly-in lunch 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM MO00 Dog or MO00 Burger $7.00 per person. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 http://www.turkeymountainairport.com

May 30 – Owasso, OK – Gundy’s Airport (O38) EAA Chapter 10 poker run to 5 different airports. $20 per hand includes lunch. For information contact: Joel Howard at oklahomajoel@yahoo.com or call 918-645-2635

June 4 – 7 – Junction City , KS – Freeman Field (3JC) National Bi-Plane Fly-in hosted by Flint Hills EAA Chapter 1364. Aircraft and pilots of all types and sizes are welcome. Information see: www.nationalbiplaneflyin.com  or email biplaneflyin@gmail.com Contact me for flyer.

June 6 – Ponca City, OK – Ponca City Regional Airport (KPNC) First Saturday breakfast. 7:00 – 10:00 AM Fantastic food; very well attended long running event. For a suggested $7.00 donation (and well worth it) you can have pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, biscuits & gravy, orange juice, coffee, and fruit. Sponsored by PNC airport booster club on the first Saturday of every month rain or shine.

June 13 – Carlisle, AR – Carlisle Municipal Airport (4M3) EAA Chapter 122 UL will host a Fly-in / Drive-in Breakfast 8:30 – 11:30 AM. This is a recurring event on the second Saturday of each month. Come to socialize and have a very good meal for a modest donation.  For additional information go to: eaaul122.org

June 20 – Cookson, OK – Tenkiller Airpark (44M) –  Jubilee Fly-in Pancake Breakfast 7:30 – 10:00 Donations Appreciated. Fuel available on the field (cash or check – no credit cards). The location is a grass strip in very good condition right on the shore of Tenkiller Lake. Overnight camping is available is available with rest rooms and showers in the FBO. Cookson Jubilee Music Festival is adjacent to the field runs Friday evening through Saturday evening featuring crafts, food & music. Come and enjoy both the Festival and the pancake breakfast.  The festival also serves some of the best BBQ you will find in the state.– Information: email: Veedster@aol.com  or Phone Val @ 918-457-4774 Contact me for event flyer.

June 27 – Shell Knob, MO – Turkey Mountain Airport (MO00) In-The-Bag Omelet fly-in 9:00 AM – Noon $5.00 per person. For additional information call: Judy at 417-858-6345; Cell 417-671-1832 http://www.turkeymountainairport.com

June 27 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) EAA chapter 165 Luncheon on the 4th Saturday every month, served, 11 to 1PM in the EAA hangar which is heated for the winter months and has big fans for the summer time.  A donation of $7.00 is suggested for all you can eat and the menu is different each month.  Usually there is formation practice for RV’s in the morning and sometimes again in the afternoon so come early and work up an appetite.  Contact: Marvin Homsley 419 360-7414 Stay for the Air Show after lunch.

June 27 – North Little Rock, AR – NLR Airport (KORK) Air Show and Car Show. Free Admission! Car show begins at 9:00 and Air Show begins at 12:00. A TFR will be in effect from 12:00 to 14:00 for 4nm centered on the airport. Contact me for event flyer.

July 4 – Ponca City, OK – Ponca City Regional Airport (KPNC) First Saturday breakfast. 7:00 – 10:00 AM Fantastic food; very well attended long running event. For a suggested $7.00 donation (and well worth it) you can have pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, biscuits & gravy, orange juice, coffee, and fruit. Sponsored by PNC airport booster club on the first Saturday of every month rain or shine.

*** Sometimes plans change and it is advisable to check before you go. ***

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Blue Skies,

Andy — email: andya@diamondcity.net

ENGINE OUT AT 33,000 FEET!

Gilbert Lopez during his Air Force days

In 1951, I graduated high school.  A year out of high school enlisted in the Air Force and applied for pilot training.  I was assigned to Reese Air Force in Texas. To get on pilot training was a long list and getting selected seemed forever.  The class finally came and I received my flight training in the Air Force.  My first assignment was to an Air Force base near Tucson, AZ.
Training was mostly uneventful.  One of the planes I flew was the T-33 Shooting Star, a single engine jet trainer.  I truly wanted to be a fighter pilot. The Korean War was winding down and fighter pilots were not needed.  I flew the F-86 for several years, up to the F-100 during the Cold War Era.  This was about 1954-57.
I chose to fulfill my term in the Air Force and get out.   After that, I joined the Air Guard in Phoenix.  An opportunity arose to take a guardsmen who needed transportation to and from the school. I flew the T-33 to get him and take him back.  We had climbed to 33,000 feet, IFR, in the clouds on the way back after dark.  After about twenty minute’s enroute, I heard and felt this loud and thud.  It seemed like an explosion in the aft part of the plane.  We were getting bounced around like crazy.
The first question was how to get the Hell out of the now, falling, bouncing, brick.  It appeared that the engine had serious mechanical problem and now the airplane became a “boat anchor”.   We pulled the handle to eject the canopy and then pull the trigger to fire off the ejection seat.  Our parachutes had to manually be pulled to open the chute.  It all worked and the rest is history.  We both made it to the ground safely.
It was discovered after everything hit the ground, including me (and the passenger) that the tail had come off from the fuselage.  This fuels the possibility that the engine came apart; thus ripping off the tail.
I went on to fly commercial planes for years, but remember this as if it was yesterday.
Editor’s Note:  Gilbert Lopez currently lives in Cave Creek, Arizona. He told me the story of the event.  It was so good; I wanted to share it with our readers. Large photo is a file photo of a T-33.  Small photo provided by Lopez.w

IOWA TAKES TO THE AIR

Iowa Takes To The Air
By Ann Holtgren Pellegreno
All states have an aviation history, some more than others.  Ohio and North Carolina have first bragging rights, of course.  Iowa has one of the best combine, compiled, accurate legacy that I have seen in any state thus far.  Three hardcopy books have been written and available to the public that is loaded with most, if not all, of the aviation history in Iowa.  We show you the three covers above.  Volume one covers the years 1845-1918; volume two from 1919-1941; volume three 1941-2003.
The author, Ann Holtgren Pellegreno is no “newbie” to aviation or writing.  Ann’s made her mark on aviation when she completed Amelia Earhart’s 1937 globe-circling flight in 1967, using the same model aircraft (see inset photo).  Ann has compiled these three volumes that will give any library a plus in quality.  One may not be from Iowa, but the information is priceless.  I was amazed that there was so much “written” history of the nature that she printed.  
Even though I have no knowledge of aviation in Iowa.  I found myself reading the book as if I knew of the people and the event.  One reading was about two brothers Sam and Tom Baldwin.  They were balloonist with a twist.  Tom would jump from the balloon and open a parachute.  He would jump from 6,000 feet and some report that the parachute opened at 400 feet.  Hummmm…  cutting it close???  I found myself not stopping, but wanting to know “do they live, or die?”  I’ll leave that to your imagination or you can buy the book.  They are powerful books with great detail of the events and consequences.  The books are two to three hundred pages each.  All pages of well-written and documentation of Iowa’s aviation history.  I am proud to have it in my library.  You will too.

Earnie Keeps Flying

Earnest Keeps Flying At 97 Years

Earnie Keeps FlyingOn December 21st 2014, Ernie Smith of Red Oak, Iowa celebrated his 97th birthday.  To be 97 is a big deal to anyone, but to be 97 and still be a fully licensed pilot with medical clearance is quite remarkable.  Perhaps, flying does keep a person “young.”  Ernie has lived the majority of his live in or near Red Oak, Iowa.  He began taking rides with area pilots in the mid to late 1930s, which really peaked an interest that has been a mainstay for him for nearly 80 years.  Ernie soloed in 1943 in Council Bluffs, Iowa flying a Luscombe, and became fully licensed after World War II in 1943.
Over the years Ernie has been able to fly many different planes.  He was never a plane owner.  He always rented, which leads him to say he has probably “paid for a few planes” in his years of flying.  But by renting he was able to fly so many different models and see technology change dramatically.  When asked if he has a “favorite” plane he said the Cessna Skylane was one of his all-time favorites due to its speed and its ability to carry a nice payload.  He thinks it’s a very well rounded plane, but was quick to state that he “never met a plane he didn’t like.”
In his many years of flying, most of his hours have been logged around the area of southwest Iowa.  Ernie drove a Budweiser truck for 35 years, and while doing his route he was known to stop by area airports for a quick flight.  He has also taken many longer distance trips, including numerous trips to Canada and a trip in 2011 with a fellow pilot to Nashville, TN to visit Ernie’s grandson Jared.  It would be tough to guess how many people Ernie has taken for their “1st plane ride”, or how many he has given rides, but we are constantly meeting people who know him as the person who took them for a ride in an airplane.  He very much enjoys that kind of notoriety!  I have ridden with him on flights for many years and could add numerous stories.   When I think of all of the hours he’s flown in 75+ years, it’s easy to see how he has so many enjoyable stories.
Currently, Ernie is averaging about 75 hours of flight time per year.  He is typically out flying a Cessna 150, which he rents at the Red Oak, Iowa Municipal Airport.  He says the people at the airport “treat him like a king”, and let him fly whenever he wants for as long as he wants.  The airport manager, Gail Ernst, and Ernie’s friends at the airport are extremely supportive of him and do a lot to keep him flying.  Recently Ernie’s friend Don Cashatt set up a radio interview at the local radio station, and they spent an hour on air talking about flying, and telling stories of the history of flying in Red Oak.
We all hope Ernie will keep flying for years to come.  When I asked him what his main motivation for flying.  He said,  “It is really not something you can explain with words.  The best way to explain is to get in an airplane on a calm day when it’s smooth as silk, get up to about 3,000 feet and watch the sunrise.  That is the way best way to explain it”

14th Anniversary Issue FLY-LOW

FLY-LOW 14th Anniversary Issue

Bob Hoover cover of the 14th Anniversary Issue for FLY-LOW

WOW!  It has been 14 big ones since I first going around selling an idea… an aviation magazine.  We are proud of our 14 years as much as we are proud of our cover story about Bob Hoover.  The cover photos came from Kim Furst, the producer of the Bob Hoover film.  If you don’t have a copy, the address is in the downloadable issue online.  If you want to subscribe to our publication that information is in the issue you download.  We will be giving away copies to those who enter for the next few months.  Entry forms are in the magazine.  Thanks for reading FLY-LOW.

Throttle Froward and Fly-Low…..

Ralph McCormick

Publisher

Download by clicking on CURRENT ISSUE above

AOPA PUSHES FOR NEW MEDICAL REFORM

FREDERICK, MD – The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) needs to reform its regulatory and certification processes, including allowing more pilots to fly without obtaining a third-class medical and making it easier to bring safety technology into the cockpit, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) told a U.S. House of Representatives Aviation Subcommittee roundtable on Feb. 25.

“The general aviation community needs a regulatory and certification environment that can keep pace with rapidly changing technology,” said Jim Coon, AOPA senior vice president of government affairs.

In remarks to the roundtable, Coon pointed out that the general aviation industry has been under stress as the number of pilots has declined and the fleet has aged. But, he said, that trend can be reversed by creating an environment that supports growth and modernization. He added that the FAA’s current regulatory and certification processes are too prescriptive and cumbersome.

Coon also told the group that the general aviation community needs third-class medical reform, which seeks to build on the sport pilot standard that has been used successfully for more than a decade. That standard allows some pilots to fly recreationally without going through the costly and time consuming process of obtaining a third-class medical certificate.

The FAA needs long-term reauthorization to ensure it has the stable funding to make necessary changes to the way the agency does business. That funding should continue to come from excise taxes on aviation fuel, as it does today, rather than from user fees, Coon said.

During discussions, Coon also addressed the high cost of equipping to meet the FAA’s 2020 ADS-B Out mandate. Coon noted that the mandate requires aircraft owners to spend thousands of dollars simply to be allowed to continue flying in the same airspace they use today.

In addition to AOPA, the roundtable included representatives from the U.S. Department of Transportation Inspector General’s office, Airlines for America, Honeywell, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association and the Reason Foundation.

PILOT’S MEDICAL???

AOPA PUSHES DOT TO END MEDICAL REFORM DELAY

FREDERICK, MD – It has been nearly seven months since the Department of Transportation (DOT) began a planned 90-day review of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA’s) proposed medical reform rule, and members of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) and the general aviation community are frustrated by the department’s inaction, AOPA President Mark Baker told Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx in a strongly worded letter.

“Proposed medical reforms, which simply seek to expand on a standard used successfully for a decade, have been under review for three years, making it incomprehensible to many in the aviation community that no action has yet been taken,” Baker wrote in the Jan. 13 letter.

The standard, which allows some pilots to fly recreationally without obtaining a third-class medical certificate, has been in use since 2004 when the FAA adopted the Sport Pilot rule.

“The evidence is clear: Allowing pilots to fly without going through the third-class medical process is safe,” Baker wrote. “The FAA’s proposed rule would simply extend this standard to more pilots flying more types of small aircraft.”

The proposed medical reforms have the support of more than 180 bipartisan members of Congress, who co-sponsored legislation known as the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act (GAPPA) that would have allowed thousands more pilots to fly without obtaining a medical certificate. Major aviation organizations and type clubs have also publically expressed support for reform as have the Flying Physicians Association and the AOPA Medical Advisory Board, whose members are both doctors and pilots.

Allowing reform to move forward will also save time and money for pilots and the federal government, while bolstering general aviation—an industry that contributes $150 billion to the economy and supports more than 1.2 million jobs but is struggling, in part because of rising costs.

AOPA estimates that medical reform, as proposed under GAPPA, would save pilots $24.6 million every year. A conservative estimate also shows an annual savings of $1.9 million to the FAA.

Because third-class medical exams take place only once every two or five years depending on age, they are no substitute for an honest relationship with a primary care doctor and the self-assessment that pilots must conduct before every flight. To help pilots accurately assess their fitness to fly, AOPA is developing a comprehensive online educational course, which will be offered free to the public.

Baker also noted that even without a medical certification requirement, pilots must undergo an evaluation with a flight instructor at least every two years to act as pilot in command. During these flight reviews, instructors evaluate the pilot’s cognitive condition, as well as his or her physical ability to safely operate an aircraft. If either is in question they do not endorse the pilot.

“Our members, the general aviation industry, members of Congress and the American people are frustrated with our government’s inability to move efficiently and effectively on issues that will improve safety, save money, and help create jobs and support local economies,” Baker wrote. “On behalf of our members and the aviation community we must ask, when will the Department of Transportation allow third-class medical reform to move forward?  The time to take action is now.”

 

ABOUT AOPA

Since 1939, AOPA has protected the freedom to fly for thousands of pilots, aircraft owners and aviation enthusiasts. AOPA is the world’s largest aviation member association, with representatives based in Frederick, Md., Washington, D.C., Wichita, Kans., and seven regions across the United States. AOPA provides member services that range from advocacy at the federal, state, and local levels to legal services, flight planning products, safety programs and award-winning media. To learn more, visit www.aopa.org.

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