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Check your local airport this week for the July issue of FLY-LOW.   to subscribe online, click on the subscribe icon.   Thanks......

FLY-LOW columnist, Alex Clark, flies and live Alaska.  To find out more about author, CFI, Clark... go to http://dragonflyaero.com/ or click on the photo on the left....

June 25, 2015 The National Transportation Safety Board is sending a go-team from its Alaska Regional office to investigate a sightseeing plane that crash near Ketchikan, Alaska. A float-equipped DeHavilland DHC-3T (Turbine Otter) airplane crashed in an area of steep, mountainous terrain about 25 miles northeast of Ketchikan. According to local authorities, multiple fatalities have been reported. NTSB investigator Brice Banning is leading the te am as investigator-in-charge. Public Affairs Officer Keith Holloway will coordinate media-related activities from Washington, DC....

For ticket information contact Holly at Heaven's Landing: (706) 982-5245   1271 Little Creek Road, Clayton, GA 30525 (706) 212-0017 ...

I’m flying my Cherokee 180 toward the east over Utah at present.  Altitude 11,500.  The desert like terrain below me is rising quickly.  In front of me are beautiful snow covered mountains; commonly know as the Rockies.  I have been watching them as they get closer and closer.  The chart shows some of them top out at 14,500 feet.  Wow! Coming from 500 feet msl, to this is a mind shaker.  However, I have some mountain flying training and actual high altitude flying in the thirty years of my flying life, thus I feel comfortable in this mountain environment. I am looking for a small town nestled in the Rockies called Pagosa Springs, CO.  The identifier in my GPS is KPSO, Stevens Field.  I know that the field elevation is 7,628 msl, traffic pattern altitude (TPA) is 8,664 feet, Unicom 122.7, and it thirty-four miles southeast of the Durango VOR.  Passing over Cortez, now over Durango (home of the Purgatory Ski area) I know...

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Alamogordo-White Sands Regional Airport, Alamogordo NM FLY-IN...

June 3, 2014, Oshkosh, WI It is with heavy hearts that we report the loss of two members of our Sonex family. Sonex Aircraft CEO Jeremy Monnett and Sonex assembly mechanic Mike Clark died yesterday in an accident involving Sonex Sport Acro N123SX at the East end of Wittman Regional Airportąs runway 9, which occurred on Tuesday, June 2nd at approximately 3:30pm. The cause of the accident remains unknown pending investigation by the FAA, NTSB and Sonex Aircraft. Sonex Aircraft founder John Monnett made a statement to staff this morning that Sonex Aircraft, LLC will continue to operate despite the holes left by Jeremy and Mikeąs absence. It would unquestionably be Jeremy Monnettąs wish that the Sonex company and the worldwide community of Sonex and AeroConversions customers carry-on. Sonex Sport Acro N123SX first flew in 2007, and has most-recently been fitted with the 100 hp AeroVee Turbo. The engine had accumulat...

First Waco Performance in 23 Years! The Heart Of Texas Airshow is proud to announce the United State Air Force Thunderbirds military jet demonstration team will bring the Red, White and Blue to the skies over Waco, Texas Saturday and Sunday June 6-7 at Texas State Technical College airport in their first performance in Waco and Central Texas in over 23 years. Along with the Thunderbirds and the Golden Knights the Trojan Phlyers Demo Team with their astounding formation aerobatics will keep you on the edge of your seat. Piloted by highly decorated combat veteran pilots performing exciting precision close formation aerobatic routines demonstrating the cutting edge performance of the Trojan T28 warbird and the flying expertise acquired in formal military training, the Trojan Phlyers demonstrate high speed action with the roar of the big engines as they fly their historic aircraft rich in military history in a unique and thrilling perf...

By Mark Frankum Are light multi engine aircraft gaining renewed appeal?  As fuel prices climbed during the post-2009 economic recovery, many aircraft owners and operators traded their light multi engine aircraft for more fuel efficient, high-performance singles. Many of these sophisticated singles deliver the speed the owners are looking for while sacrificing a certain amount of useful load, roominess, and perceived safety advantages. One obvious result of this paradigm shift is a very depressed market for light twins. Many light twins that might have fetched more than $250k before the market crash now sell for perhaps 60% of that former value. Now, with Avgas prices tumbling nationwide, many are giving light twins a second look partly because the gap between the operating costs associated with a light twin versus the costs of operating a high-performance single is narrowing.  Sure, it’s still more expensive to operate a ligh...