Recent Articles

WELL, THE DECISION IS IN FROM THE FAA As of today, it appears that the FAA has produced the name and the law.  Here is the EAA take on the new medical ruling.   EAA STATEMENT ON FAA RELEASE OF THIRD-CLASS MEDICAL REFORM RULE FAA’s BasicMed will take effect on May 1, 2017 EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin — (January 10, 2017) — Years of effort by EAA and AOPA culminated on Tuesday morning as the FAA announced regulations that will implement the aeromedical reform law passed last July. The regulations will be published Wednesday as a final rule, to take effect May 1, 2017.  According to the FAA, no changes have been made to the language in the law. Because it is final, the rule – named “BasicMed” by the FAA – will not go out for a typical public comment period. The FAA also said it would publish an advisory circular describing the implementation of the rule later this week. “This is the momen...

My Enemy, My Friend.... Dan Cherry wrote this book.  It is an amazing story of air combat and friendship. Take a listen.  It is long, but an awesome story. GO HERE...

In Walnut Ridge AR, is one of the best $100 Hamburger locations... dine in a "retired" Boeing 737. GO HERE...

C-130 Lands and takes off from USS Forrestal. https://youtu.be/uM5AI3YSV3M C130 lands on an aircraft carrier 29 times in 1963.    ...

A very good site to obtain factual weather.   GO HERE...

To the point: A salute to brevity!   By Ralph McCormick On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered a short speech at the end of the ceremonies dedicating the battlefield cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. That speech has come to be known as the Gettysburg Address. There are just two hundred sixty-six words in the speech. I know many people, who believe that more words produce a better document, preach an enhanced sermon, teach a superior class, and communicate a sincere message to a friend. It is not the length of a speech, but the brevity and substance of it that sticks with the heart. Lincoln’s message is still with us after all these years. When ones message is long; boredom sets in and the mind falls to sleep. Keep it short and simple but direct and to the point.   This is the Gettysburg Address: "Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this Continent a new nat...

By Rose Marie Kern (photo) For years now the FAA has been moving towards changing all flight plans, both VFR and IFR filed within the U.S. border to ICAO.  A few years ago ICAO Flight Plans were required for IFR flights requesting RVSM handling, then it was required of all aircraft crossing the ADIZ.  As of the end of January 2017, ALL flight plans will be required to use the ICAO form. But it doesn’t have to be painful.  For GA aircraft doing VFR flights, most of the information entered into the current domestic flight plans is the same, it just looks a little different.   If you call flight service, you give all the same information for all but three fields of the flight plan.  What’s new is the type of flight field, the wake turbulence category and the equipment field.    There are a lot of extra fields in the bottom half of the flight plan – but they are not required for domestic flights. Say you are going to ...

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by Pat Purcell USA Unlimited Teeam L-R  Bob Freeman, Robbie Gibbs (alternate), Mike Ciliberti, Mark Nowosielski, Jim Bourke, Craig Gifford, Tim Just, Rob Holland, not present Mike Gallaway   2016 FAI WORLD ADVANCED AEROBATIC CHAMPIONSHIP August 4-14, 16   Radon, Poland It is an amazing accomplishment to send a team and aircraft to the World Aerobatic Championships every year.  There is much fund raising involved and then the travel and getting the planes all around the world.  The pilots will be involved for weeks with the travel, prepping, practicing and then competing.  The Worlds are a big stage and the US stands tall on it year after year.  The pilots are selected in the preceding year at the National Championships in September and then compete the following August at locations that change each year. The US 2016 Advanced Team stood on the podium in Poland proudly wearing Silver Medals.  The French tea...

WASHINGTON — The National Transportation Safety Board determined Tuesday that the flight crew’s mismanagement of the approach and multiple deviations from standard operating procedures caused the Nov. 10, 2015, crash of a Part 135 on-demand charter flight in Akron, Ohio. The charter company’s casual attitude toward compliance with standards was a contributing factor in the accident. Execuflight flight 1526, en route to Akron Fulton International Airport, was on a non-precision approach and descended below the minimum descent altitude, even though the pilots did not have the runway in sight. When the first officer attempted to arrest the descent, the airplane, a British Aerospace HS 125-700A (Hawker 700A), entered an aerodynamic stall and crashed into a four-unit apartment building, killing all nine persons on board the airplane. There were no fatalities on the ground. “Execuflight’s casual attitude toward safety likely le...