Recent Articles

Check this Branson (MO) event.  Go to the post and double click on the image to enlarge and read...   ...

Alexander Polli, the base jumper who filmed this event, died recently in a failed jump.   https://youtu.be/8L8UCfxmtSw...

Americans have a bipolar relationship with government. On one hand we decry “oppressive regulation and interference” while on the other; we actually beg and lobby for it. But, hey it’s our nature and probably why most politicians mimic Janus and wear two faces, one for the independent and one for the dependent. We must make them crazy – Get OUT of my pocket you thieving Washington scum, and in the same breath – WHY you lazy good-for-nothing louts need do something about this. This has always been the case with aviation for as long as I can remember. We want a ‘hands off’ approach via the Pilot Bill of Rights while demanding direct intervention via medical reform. Aviation started out as a perceived passing fad that the government had absolutely no desire to regulate, motivate, and if anything, they kept it at arm’s length viewed as little more than rampant psychopaths flying about in the sky. Can you blame them after...

On this date, August 23, 1938, the Gwinn's Aircar crashed and killed two. Gwinn had designed what he deemed was a safe, roadable airplane after two years of dedicated research and development, and in 1935 he organized the Gwinn Aircar Company Inc. in Buffalo, serving as the new firm's president and chief engineer. Two years later, the prototype Gwinn Aircar was completed and test-flown by Richard K. Bennett, who also gave well-known aviator Frank Hawks the chance to test the new plane. After Hawks flew the Aircar in Buffalo, he was so enthusiastic about its performance that he agreed to become Gwinn Aircar's vice president in charge of sales. The Gwinn Aircar Company of Buffalo, NY was formed in 1935 by Joseph M Gwinn, Jr, former Chief Engineer at Consolidated Aircraft Corporation. The 'Aircar' was designed as a 'foolproof' airplane that would be simple and, above all, safe to fly since it would neither stall nor spin. The airc...

Make your plans to attend the Colorado event....

TO READ THE ENTIRE PILOT'S BILL OF RIGHTS 2 -  CLICK HERE...

From the NTSB Aviation Accident website Accident occurred Saturday, August 06, 2016 in Burns Flat, OK Aircraft: WILSON BUGATTI-DEMONGE 100P Injuries: 1 Fatal. On August 6, 2016, about 0820 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Wilson Bugatti-DeMonge 100P airplane, N110PX, impacted terrain during takeoff from runway 35L at the Clinton-Sherman Airport (CSM), near Burns Flat, Oklahoma. A subsequent ground fire occurred. The airline transport rated pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed during the impact and ground fire. The airplane was registered to Le Reve Bleu LLC and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 test flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from CSM at the time of the accident. Witness at the airport reported that the ...

Throttle Forward By Ralph McCormick BINGO FUEL! If what has been reported to FLY-LOW Publications is true, there needs to be more inquiries about the crash of the Air Force Thunderbirds plane. I have it from “reliable” sources that the Air Force Thunderbird plane that crashed in Colorado Springs, CO, was forced to remain in the air “waiting” for the president to arrive late after the pilots of two of the four planes called, “Bingo Fuel.”  That means that the plane is almost out of fuel.  All the reports that I read basically said that it was engine trouble, had a problem, no know cause and other “spin” stories.  If what I hear through circles is true, someone wanted all four planes in the air until the “tardy” president showed up at the stadium.  This decision was at no matter the cost.  The cost could have been very high if the plane had run out fuel just before the stadium; thus crashing into the cr...

By Rose Marie Kern Is flight following what you think it is? Last week I took a call from a pilot who wanted to file a VFR flight plan and get a standard briefing.  I got to the AIRSPACE NOTAM section of the brief and was about to give him information on parachute jumping and unmanned rocket activity enroute when he stopped me and said “I don’t need those, I’ll be doing flight following and the Center will keep me away from them.” “Houston, we have a problem.”   This pilot expressed a belief that Flight Following would give him all the same benefits as flying IFR but without the hassle of having ATC direct his every move.   The reality is that VFR Flight Following can be very helpful to the pilots, but has its limitations. The controller’s bible, FAA Order 7110.65, and the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) both describe Flight Following as simply “Traffic Advisories”.  These Advisories are issued...

In a few words to describe AirVenture they would have to be 'O my Gosh, Oshkosh!!!  Our staff has just returned from Wisconson and the "WORLD'S BUSIEST AIRPORT AND FLY-IN."  My wife and I experienced the awesome world of flight and the largest gathering of aircraft that one could imagine.  Our staff of eight or nine brought home photos, stories, information, and so many memories.  I have been attending since the mid-eighties.   My experience there never ceases to amaze me.  If you haven't been, YOU MUST GO! Here are the words of a first timer, "I absolutely could not believe how massive the event was… It was amazing to see so many airplanes in one place at one time.  The airshows were outstanding,   To see how humongous that Air Force plane was (C5-M)… its seems unfathomable that a plane that size flies.  In a nut shell AMAZING Is the best word to describe the whole event." I am just going to place as many photos...